Last month while my husband and I were shopping for a couple of Christmas gifts, we encountered some unusual (and perhaps pretentious) ceramic savings banks that made me chuckle due to the idea behind them and how timing in the retail market is uncanny. Obviously the creator of these items was somehow affected, even if creatively, by the current recession and saw a need to monetize on the misfortune of others. Notice in the photo below how the “Mall Money Fund” is the same size as the “New House Fund.”

Mall Money and New House Fund banks

Mall Money and New House Fund banks

If one were to take this literally (silly, I know) one could almost say it’s maybe what got us into the whole housing fiasco; spending at the mall is somehow equivalent to saving for a new house. Of course, during the housing boom years when potential buyers didn’t need much, if any, down payment I guess someone could equivocate that buying a house was similar to going shopping at the mall.

Or, looking at the savings containers from a different perspective, it could be viewed as a way to categorize your savings in general. Maybe that was the point of the containers – savings needs to be specific. Either way I look at it, it still strikes me as humorous. Another photo below is a retirement savings piggy bank compared to a “Shoe Fund” container. I’m pretty sure the “Shoe Fund” is larger.

Retirement Fund vs. Shoe Money Fund

Retirement Fund vs. Shoe Money Fund

Of course there were plenty of other ceramic banks such as a “Green Fees” and “What the IRS Missed.” All of course the same size. I guess that just seeing them on display might be a positive enough action that could subconsciously promote people to save for specific goals. Motivation is half the battle; doing it is the other half.

What are your thoughts on these photos? Do you think that it would motivate one to save money? It caught my attention enough to write about it.